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Holiday Planning

Travel health and vaccination often seem to be an afterthought in planning a holiday. However, If you are pregnant, or planning a pregnancy some of the immunisations or anti-malaria medications that you need for your holiday may be inadvisable. Simply deciding not to have them, however, may put you, and your unborn baby, at risk and it may be better to defer your trip.

IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR PLANNING A PREGNANCY GET TRAVEL HEALTH ADVICE BEFORE YOU BOOK. EITHER TALK TO YOUR OWN DOCTOR OR WE WOULD BE HAPPY TO ADVISE YOU.

If you have a condition for which you need regular medication there may be problems with some immunisations and anti-malarials.

Similarly, some conditions, such as psoriasis, may flare up with some immunisations or anti-malarials.

IF YOU HAVE AN ONGOING MEDICAL CONDITION (EVEN IF IT SEEMS TO BE A MINOR PROBLEM) GET TRAVEL HEALTH ADVICE BEFORE YOU BOOK. EITHER TALK TO YOUR OWN DOCTOR OR WE WOULD BE HAPPY TO ADVISE YOU.

There are a number of other considerations if you take regular medication. Some countries ban certain drugs which are readily available here. If you take regular medication, especially pain-killers consider seeking advice from that country’s Embassy or High Commission.

If you do travel with medication consider taking it in your “take-on” bags but having a back-up supply with your checked luggage.

It may be helpful to take a letter from your GP detailing the medication that you are carrying ESPECIALLY if you need to carry needles and syringes or liquids.


Staying Healthy On Holiday

While you might think that the greatest risk to your health is illness on holiday, in fact you are much more likely to be involved in a road traffic accident.

There are a number of reasons for this, many of which can be helped by some straightforward actions on your part.

It seems obvious but don’t forget that most of the world drives on the ‘other side of the road’!

Customs and ways of driving abroad can be very different to the UK, so that you may not be expecting a manoeuvre that a driver makes and they may be surprised by your actions. In many places drivers take many more risks than drivers here. Alcohol is often a factor in accidents abroad. People on holiday often drink more than they would at home and may be inclined to take greater risks. Given the difficulties of driving abroad it is safest to avoid all alcohol before driving.

 
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